Chalmers Medal

The Chalmers Medal recognises researchers in tropical medicine or global health who demonstrate evidence of mentoring and professional development of junior investigators, and other forms of capacity building.

The Chalmers Medal is for those at the mid stage of their career. 

Eligibility and nominations

Nominations next open in 2022.   

  • Nominations are annual
  • Nominees should be researchers in tropical medicine or international health from anywhere in the world, who obtained their last relevant qualification between 15 and 20 years ago, allowing for career breaks 
  • Nominations must show evidence of mentoring of junior investigators, and evidence of providing professional development to junior investigators.
  • Nominations should come from RSTMH members and Fellows ONLY
  • Nominees should be RSTMH members or Fellows ONLY
  • Self-nominations must be accompanied by a supporting statement from an RSTMH members or Fellow
     

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History and prize

The Chalmers Medal

Dr Albert John Chalmers, MD, FRCS, DPH was born in Manchester in 1870 and began his distinguished tropical career in Ghana where he worked from 1897 to 1901.

He spent the following ten years in Sri Lanka before becoming a Holt Fellow of University College, Liverpool. From 1913 to 1920 he was Director of the Wellcome Research Laboratories in the Sudan. He died in Calcutta on 5 April 1920.

In 1921, Mrs Chalmers, his widow gave £500 to RSTMH in memory of her husband. The RSTMH Council decided to devote this money to the foundation of the Chalmers Memorial Medal.

The Chalmers Medal recognises researchers in tropical medicine or global health who demonstrate evidence of mentoring and professional development of junior investigators, and other forms of capacity building.

These skills are in line with Dr Chalmers’ own values of supporting the work of younger researchers. Dr Chalmers was known for being ready with help and encouragement to those early in their careers.

Recipients recieve a medal, which is in silver gilt, and bears a likeness of Dr Chalmers and the motto Zonae torridae tutamen on one side, and the other side is a representation of Anopheles gambiae above a spray of the cinchona plant and encircled by the name of the Society.

2021 Chalmers Medal recipient: Professor Charles Wondji

Charles Wondji is a Professor of vector biology and genetics at the Liverpool School of Tropical medicine (LSTM) and the Executive Director of the Centre for Research in Infectious Diseases (CRID) in Cameroon.

He uses genetic and genomic tools to help control mosquito vectors of diseases such as malaria, arboviral diseases with a special focus on insecticide resistance. He is sponsor of several African research fellows and member of several international committees including at IVCC and WHO.

Because all humans have the ability to perform to the highest level if given the right support and mentorship, capacity building of young scientists, notably from disease endemic countries, is vital to improve global health

Charles Wondji

Professor Wondji obtained his PhD in 2003 in Cameroon with the French research Institute IRD, working on the population genetics of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae complex in Cameroon. He later moved in 2004 to the vector group of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine as a postdoctoral research associate to study the genetics and molecular basis of insecticide resistance in Anopheles funestus.

In 2008, he was awarded a Wellcome Trust Research career development fellow for five years to characterise the mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance in natural population of Anopheles funestus in Africa.

In 2013, he was awarded a Wellcome trust senior fellowship in Biomedical Sciences to improve the control of this major malaria vector in Africa by developing new molecular diagnostic tools, understanding the evolution of resistance and its impact on control interventions.

Professor Wondji was promoted to Reader in 2014 and to Professor in Vector Genetics 2018.