Emerging Leaders Award

The Emerging Leaders Award recognises significant contributions in leadership and service, including mentoring and other forms of capacity building, to the fields of tropical medicine and global health.

The Award is specifically for those who are at the early stages of their careers.  

Eligibility and nominations

Nominations next open in March 2021

  • Nominations are annual
  • Nominees should be early career investigators from and based in low- and middle-income countries. For the purpose of this award, we define “early career” as a maximum of 10 years’ active employment post-training, discounting career breaks
  • Nominees will have made a significant contribution to leadership, including mentorship and capacity building of others
  • Nominations should come from RSTMH members and Fellows ONLY 
  • Nominees should be RSTMH members ONLY
  • Self-nomination, with a supporting statement from another RSTMH member or Fellow is permitted
  • Nominations must demonstrate a significant contribution in leadership and service, including mentorship and capacity building
     

Become a member

History and prize

The award was established in 2016 to recognise significant contributions in leadership and service, including mentoring and other forms of capacity building, to the fields of tropical medicine and global health.

The award comprises:

  • A £5,000 personal cash prize
  • A certificate
  • Access to mentorship through the RSTMH Board of Trustees and wider network
  • A platform to give a keynote speech at an RSTMH scientific meeting.

2020 Emerging Leaders Award recipient: Emmanuel Nene Odjidja

The Emerging Leaders Award in 2020 went to Mr Emmanuel Nene Odjidja, whose aims are to research and evaluate global health programmes in low- and middle-income countries. 

"Thank you to my colleague Honorine for endorsing my nomination and to the Committee for the selection."

Emmanuel Nene Odjidja

Having worked in Ghana, South Sudan and now Burundi, he is interested in researching novel approaches from a health systems perspective to reduce transmission of infectious diseases among pregnant women and improve child survival. 

Through working and providing mentorship to local staff, he aims to improve the quality of global health research and evaluations, especially in humanitarian and fragile settings in sub-Sahara Africa.  

As the Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Technical lead for a grassroots organisation – Village Health Works in Burundi – he has set up a routine training programme (Kigutu M&E Institute), which has so far trained 32 clinicians and programme staff on topics relating to epidemiology, evaluation techniques and health systems strengthening.